Taking over person to person – vol.2 –

We are so grateful for things generated from nature and people, people and people, things and people, and all relationships and connections, the heart of prayer reflects to the knot of the creations as well.

For the Japanese, “Sending a gift” is a “Custom” inherited as an essential culture since ancient times.

To send is to give “gratitude,” the origin is an “offering.”

Cuisine that we appreciate nature’s blessings and dedicate is called “Shinsen.” We will use ingredients harvested in that area, making the best “feast.” The beginning of Japanese offerings is said to be Shinsen. We dedicate it to the god of the land with prayer and then share and have them at the end of the festival. Pray, eat, and appreciate. Thanks for the material, thanks for the blessings of the four seasons. The roots of sending a gift have the spirit to be grateful and sharing. The tradition was generated from this background that we send a gift at events that mark one’s life stages like marriage or delivery, or seasonal turning points.

The word “Musubi (means knot)” has a special meaning connecting either human and human or heart and heart. “Musubi” that ties the fate and spirits has an origin of “Musuhi,” which is the base of all creations ー the meaning of the source of everything as well as producing and growing all. We are so grateful for things generated from nature and people, people and people, things and people, and all relationships and connections, the heart of prayer reflects to the knot of the creations as well.

Send. Knot.

These two words show Japanese spirits making a relationship, connecting, and appreciating all rather than one-way exchange.

  • PhotosYoshiyuki Mori
  • WordsAtsuko Ogawa
  • DesignNoriaki Hosaka
  • Translation Mina Ishikawa